Photo of the Week: Fort Knox, Maine

This week’s photo is from inside Fort Knox in Maine. Not to be confused with the more famous U.S. Army post of the same name in Kentucky (which is what people usually think of when someone says “It’s more secure than Fort Knox”), this Fort Knox was a Civil War fort built between 1844 and […]

Photo of the Week: One If By Land, Two If By Sea, New York, NY

This week’s photo is of the restaurant One If By Land, Two If By Sea, one of New York City’s most famous allegedly haunted places. Located in the West Village and originally built in 1767 as a carriage house, it was purchased by an aspiring politician named Aaron Burr in 1794. Burr would later become […]

Photo of the Week: Massachusetts State House, Boston, MA

This week’s photo is not of an allegedly haunted location. This week, to show solidarity with the people of Boston, we are featuring a photo of the Boston State House. As a New Yorker and a Yankee fan, I give Boston a lot of ribbing. But in times like this, in the wake of the […]

Photo of the Week: The Conference House, Staten Island, NY

The Conference House, also known as the Billopp House, is a colonial mansion in the Tottenville section of Staten Island, N.Y. It’s historically significant because on September 11th, 1776, Ben Franklin, John Adams and Edward Rutledge held a Peace Conference here with British officials, in an attempt to stop the Revolutionary War. They failed. The […]

Photo of the Week: The Alice Austen House

This week’s photo is from the Alice Austen House Museum, located on Staten Island, New York. The house, as you may have guessed, was the home of the now-famous photographer Alice Austen. Alice first became interested in photography when her uncle, Oswald Müller, brought home a camera in approximately 1876. Alice’s uncle Peter Townsend Austen was […]

Photo of the Week: Morris-Jumel Mansion, New York City, NY

This week’s photo features the oldest house in Manhattan, the Morris-Jumel Mansion. Built in 1765 by Roger Morris, the mansion was used as a temporary headquarters for General George Washington after he and his army were forced to flee Brooklyn Heights after the Battle of Long Island. Later on in the war, it served as […]

Photo of the Week: Morris-Jumel Mansion, New York City, NY

This week’s photo features the oldest house in Manhattan, the Morris-Jumel Mansion. Built in 1765 by Roger Morris, the mansion was used as a temporary headquarters for General George Washington after he and his army were forced to flee Brooklyn Heights after the Battle of Long Island. Later on in the war, it served as […]

Photo of the Week: The Van Cortlandt House, The Bronx, NY

This week’s photo is of the Van Cortlandt House, the oldest building in the Bronx, New York City. The house was built in the Georgian style by Frederick Van Cortlandt (1699–1749) in 1748 for his family. Van Cortlandt died before its completion and the property was inherited by his son, James Van Cortlandt (1727–1787). It was built in […]

Photo of the Week: The Stanley Hotel, Estes Park, CO

This week’s photo is of the Stanley Hotel in Estes Park, Colorado. Built by Freelan Oscar Stanley of Stanley Steamer fame, the hotel opened its doors on July 4, 1909, and was host to a number of high-profile guests including the RMS Titanic survivor Margaret Brown, John Philip Sousa, Theodore Roosevelt, the Emperor and Empress of Japan, and a variety of Hollywood personalities. But the Stanley Hotel […]

Photo of the Week: The Matron’s House, Staten Island, NY

This week’s photo, like last week’s photo, comes from Snug Harbor on Staten Island, New York. Rumored to be the most haunted building on the grounds of Snug Harbor, it even attracted the team from TAPS as they filmed their Ghost Hunters episode “Murdered Matron” at Snug harbor, and the episode got its name from […]